The Science (and Neuroscience) of Scent

I stumbled upon a fascinating article on the science of scent, how we smell what we do, why we have scent differences, anosmia, and olfactory neuroscience. That led me down a rabbit hole to additional articles on: the shape and movement of odor molecules; the link between taste and smell; how scent, emotion, and memory are intertwined; “Super Tasters;” the role of ageing and even mental health; biophysiological differences; and so much more.  As I have plenty of time while waiting for the drydown of an attar test to finish, I thought I would share with you what I learnt.

Source: Thought Co.

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Areej Le Doré Indian Attars – Part II: Gulab & Motia

Gulab rose attar and Motia jasmine attar will be the focus of Part II of my look at Areej Le Doré‘s Indian Attar Collection. As a side note, for the sake of time-management, length, and brevity (to the extent that I can muster such a thing), I’ve decided to move the scent descriptions and results of layering four attars, three attars, and various duos into a separate Part III to be posted another day.

Kannauj attar producers in India. Source: bbc.co.uk

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Areej Le Doré Indian Attars- Part I: Tuba, Champa, & Genda

Areej Le Doré has released a five-piece Indian Attar Collection, each focusing on a single flower combined with Mysore sandalwood and prepared in the centuries-old Indian bronze pot method of distillation.

Today, in Part I, I’ll provide a broad introductory overview to the collection, cover the particular methodology and raw materials that were used, then share an olfactory description of three of the attars. They will be the tuberose, champaca, and marigold attars. Part II in several days time will describe the rose and jasmine ones, Gulab and Motia. Part III will cover different attar layering combinations and what they smell like.

Areej Indian Attar Collection. Photo: Areej Le Dore. [Photo cropped by me at the top.]

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Rogue Perfumery Chypre Siam

Chypre Siam is a whimsical, creative, and original take on the classical chypre genre. Manuel Cross, a former chef of 25 years, whisks up Thai cuisine with the zingy, zesty, bitter freshness of South East Asia’s Kaffir lime, aromatic green basil, the heat of fiery red chili peppers, and a touch of delightful lemongrass in lieu of the traditional French top notes. Then, he deftly swerves back to the classics with lush, indolic florals in the middle and verdant oakmoss in the base along with a load of skanky civet, amber, dark nitro musk (musk ketone), and dark, occasionally medicinal, smoky leather.

I really enjoy the fun, original opening of Chypre Siam and its vibrant character that demands attention and respect. Yet, I find myself somewhat ambivalent when I consider the fragrance as a whole from start to finish.

Photo by Weerapong Chaipuck. Source: deMilked. (Direct website link to Mr. Chaipuck’s photos embedded within.)

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